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INDA workshop and exhibition
@ATT19 Gallery

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THE CHINATOWN EFFECT

INDA workshop and exhibition

@ATT19 Gallery

Bangkok,

2019

“The Chinatown effect” is a temporary installation at the ATT19 gallery designed and constructed in four weeks by INDA students in Bangkok. The project starts as a site-specific stage set, a series of props and composite videos investigating the notion of commonality and stereotype - in relationship to the world of Chinatown(s) as social typologies. When analysed through the Chinese cultural attitude towards reproducibility, the proliferation of Chinatowns reveals a network of what we define “authentic trans-territorial clichés”. We need to craft challenging techniques for the legitimization and preservation of such a specific yet diffused identity: Chinatowns are constantly reconstructed and experienced in different parts of the world, growing into a familiar system of habits, reminiscences and iconographical values that became a simulacrum of a sophisticated, layered domesticity for everybody.

Once inside the pavilion, the spectator, through videos on multiple screens, inhabit a “Chinatownised “ world made of communal rituals. The stage set itself, through its materiality, structure and ornaments, is a spatial manifestation of stereotypical yet identitarian forces: an inhabitable red folie, a dragon, a votive pavilion - a purposely recognizable architectural cliché. The project was first conceived and exhibited in Bangkok, then it will travel around the globe, to be showcased in the Chinatowns of different continents.

The Oxford Dictionary defines “Chinatown” as “a district of any non-Chinese town, especially a city or seaport, in which the population is predominantly of Chinese origin”. However, some Chinatowns may have little to do with China, while they certainly have in common with other Chinatowns in different locations. Indeed, if one hand these communities were able to resist and preserve their cultural origins more than other ethnic enclaves, they were also subject to a natural process of diffusion, exposure and commodification - that witnessed the rise of a worldwide shared "Chinatownised" identity. Travellers find there secure places where to recollect memories and authentic experiences. Clusters of exotic stimulating clichés - goods, signs and behaviours - that trigger an intuitive sense of familiarity and international domesticity.

The Chinese have two different concepts of a copy. Fangzhipin are imitations where the difference from the original is obvious. These are small models or copies that can be purchased in a museum shop, for example. The second concept for a copy is Fuzhipin. They are exact reproductions of the original, which, for the Chinese, are of equal value to the original. It has absolutely no negative connotations. The discrepancy with regard to the understanding of what a copy has often led to misunderstandings and arguments between Chinese and Western culture. Especially for Europeans, it’s difficult to accept that identity and renewal can be not mutually exclusive. Instead, in the Chinese culture - where continual reproduction represents a technique for conservation and preservation - replicas are anything but mere copies.

Taught and curated by

Lemonot

with

INDA students

Mook Attakanwong

Mook Attakanwong

Exhibition and Performance
@Archi Fest Singapore

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METTICI LA FACCIA

Exhibition and Performance

@Archi Fest Singapore

Singapore,

2019

“I cannot do a building without building a new repertoire of characters, of stories, of language and it’s all parallel. It’s not just building per se. It’s building worlds” J. Hejduk

We have been affected by a strange form of spatial Pareidolia. We are obsessively looking for anthropomorphic traces - hidden in the built apparatus that shapes the world. Our designs could not exist without the invention of the bizarre troupe supposed to populate them. Their stories, fears and love affairs intimately inform the architectural substance itself. Each building becomes a peculiar persona.

We practice only forms of knowledge based on physical experience: direct or emerged through the tangible re-enactment of empirical conditions. Speculation isn’t understood as pure invention or as a biased device to fill the gaps left by our uncertainties, but as a lens to frame and relentlessly process reality through design culture. The project is a journey articulated through a series of spatial performances. For us, performing has little to do with practical efficiency or quantitative variables. Rather, it is an evocative tool to activate symbolic links, to claim back identitarian needs and to depict qualitative hedonistic traits into physical spatial compounds.

The design process is nurtured through the assemblage of composite filters to enhance or alterate the human perception of coexisting beings, objects and spaces. Through a palimpsest of precise drawings and short films, we engaged with the architectural effects they produced on the real. The performative representation of space, together with its peculiar synthases and syntax, is an effective tool for a linguistic self-liberation: architects are provided with an appropriate vocabulary that finally re-connects them with a wider public.

Directed and curated by

Lemonot

with

Federico Armeni

Palma Bucarelli

Arianna Zamparelli

Simone Salviati

Tommaso Riccitelli

Gianluca Lorenzini

Vincenzo Morreale

Stacy Peh

Video

Agnese Sumonte

Pavilion _competition
@Festival of Creative Urban Living

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THE INFLATABLE HUT

Pavilion _competition

@Festival of Creative Urban Living

Milton Keynes,

2019

Milton Keynes ‘s community will soon experience a set of urban mirabilia: roundabouts will be turned into agoras, crossing lines into playgrounds and parking lots in gathering compounds.

In such a context we propose an inhabitable festive object. An optimistic round shape to attract and cuddle the visitors, a lightly monumental framework to strengthen the celebratory apparatus of this festival.

A temporary structure that is indeed ephemeral and utopian. Feel free to walk through it or to stay for longer - a pleasant breeze will blow filtered by the hanging telescopes. A rigid basement which acts as an urban carpet - punctured by three different paths: from two sides extravagant portals are welcoming pedestrian, fast bikers, and slow thinkers while a tiny path entering from the small mouth of the balloon is large enough just to crawl in. A privileged door only for curious children.

Once inside, the basement itself becomes a smooth bench; then, rings of soft seats arise from the perimeter, framing a 360 intimate theatre: a place to rest alone or to laugh together. Eventually, anchored on top of everything, this colorful balloon stands silently: an architecture to be questioned - impalpable yet very present.

Designed by

Lemonot

Micro tools – Suitcase
@Milan Design Week

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LIBIDINAL PERSPECTIVES

Micro tools - Suitcase

@Milan Design Week

Milan,

2019

Our tools are our references. Our references are our obsessions. As hedonistic adventurers, we could only work through those - our obsessions are the only burden that we carry around. We haunt for patterns which are forged by the anatomy of pleasure, forms shaped through irreverent gestures and everything that speaks of an erotic language. We wallow in foam, asking blacksmiths to fabricate creamy glaze. Fond of tactile smells, we confused the carver with a mysterious mixologist. We love to objectify – to transform ideas literally and wildly into an apparatus of built dreams. Our working table is a potluck between production and consumption - front and back – depression and euphoria.

In how many ways you can use a pair of boobs? Porn for the privileged, Architecture for Everyone.

Designed and constructed by

Lemonot

Exhibition

KooZA/rch

(Ab)Normal

Exhibition and Performance
@Low Fat Art Festival

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INTIMATE MEMORABILIA

Exhibition and Performance

@Low Fat Art Festival

Bangkok,

2019

"Memory is not an instrument for surveying the past but its theatre. It is the medium of past experience, just as the earth is the medium in which dead cities lie buried. He who seeks to approach his own buried past must conduct himself like a man digging." - Walter Benjamin

The Thang Nguan Vintage House is a place where time freezes: from its decadent walls and faded colors to its neighboring communities, you suddenly find yourselves in another era. Once inside, after the narrow staircase that gives access to the terrace, visitors are immersed within layers of objects, still imprinted with collective personal memories.

The project, developed through a series of ephemeral rooms, does nothing more than emphasizing and creating a path between these fragments that were once used and nowadays are still intact: the aim is to preserve their peculiar value through pure matter within a theatrical space. The exhibition has been designed as an architectural still life, where, through delicate surfaces and heterogeneous openings, you are able to be face to face with these objects. This curated space is a point of departure to be part of someone's recollection of playing - eating - travelling.

As architects, we not only assembled personal relics, images, photographs, and other documents but we became archivists who, shaping the geometry and the materiality of the rooms, were able to frame multiple views on this intimate past. For the first time, this private space is open to the public, which becomes the main actor, in dialogue with belongings and pieces of uncle Poonsak's story.

During the festival the deck of this house became a meeting point for all the people of the neighborhood, with events during the day and concerts in the evening. After the dismantling of the exhibition, the stage set has been used for performances by local artists.The whole structure is super light, composed of three metal curved rails, coloured in bright pink, holding white translucent curtains to frame three different spaces - punctured by an intricate path made of terrazzo-like rubber scrap. This linear carpet guides through the objects on the floor, leaning also towards the central table – a sculptural piece constructed with inverted traditional Thai wooden trusses, found on site.

Designed and directed by

Lemonot

with

Wayla Amatathammachad

Riewparboon Watnaree

Kanich Khajohnsri

Atichart Watanapichetpong

Praewrung Chantumrongkul

Natcha Thanachanan

Photos

Prin Tumsatan

Interactive sculpture
@Asa Exhibition

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PERENNIAL TOPIARY

Interactive sculpture

@Asa Exhibition

Bangkok,

2019

Welcome to the Anthropocene, in today’s overwhelming global evidence that atmospheric, geologic, hydrologic, biospheric and other earth system processes are now altered by humans, perennial topiary is a collection of possible solutions, projections, rejections, moments which are worth to share globally.

We defined ecology not only restricted to our environment but as well on subcultures, ethical scarcity and money excess. Realities that most of the time are underneath our eyes and just not been picked up upon. The more that we forget, the more we do not care.

In this Perennial Topiary everytime that a flower is picked up, a thread of needed knowledge is shaped. One flower is one project. We will construct our topiary out of hundreds of projects. Curiosity to raise awareness.

Designed and costructed

Lemonot

with

Khine Thin Aye

Ann Pavinee Langenskiöld

Pang Nontavatit

Pai Prima

Artist residency
@Manifesta 12 _ XRivista

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DANISINNI ON STAGE

Artist residency

@Manifesta 12 _ XRivista

Danisinni is a peculiar enclave, whose dystopian reality clashes with the naturally relaxed attitude of its people.

Coco' runs a familiar tavern in the central square, spending his entire day serving only friends he grew up with. Piero can't stand still and, through a daily procession from the market to PalaMangano, feeds his necessities and desires.

We worked in here for just two weeks, which is nothing. You need to consume our proposed image of the neighborhood in two hours, which is less than nothing. Be ready to acknowledge that you will forcely have a very PoP experience in this very popular realm.

Extraction - De-contextualisation - Appropriation Stratification or Aware Alienation ? No matter what, awareness leads to truth. Maybe personal and constructed, but still a valuable truth.

An artistic stage-set is a medium to challenge the relationship between yourself and the palimpsest that surrounds you. Indeed, you often don’t know enough to call it context. We strongly rely on the descriptive power of mundane objects and the beauty of ordinary behaviours. However, we must question our perception of aesthetic qualities and symbolic values embedded into these rituals.

As artists, do we highlight or do we actually impose these qualities? As art consumers, do we perceive or do we desire them?

What appears exotic and unconventional, claims to be profoundly ordinary. We provide objectified facts to strengthen the power of our subjective descriptions. We pair objects and actions to create metaphorical diptychs. Apparently random juxtapositions enable meaningful bridges, providing effective snapshots to reconstruct identities.

We want you to accept that you can have just a glimpse of these characters. Intuitive portraits, neither exhaustive nor superficial. Just enough to catch what you can afford. Be conscious that metaphors are subjective and arbitrary.

Eventually, does this project dignify or mislead?

We do think that “La Pesca delle Arancine” is a generously deceiving artistic micro-economy. And Piero must value his “Coppini” as a tremendous example of crafting.

Directed and curated by

Lemonot

with

Gianmarco Cugusi

Olmo Missaglia

Stefano La Rosa

Francesco Battaglia

Farida Gueci

Photos

Lemonot

Giorgio Masi

Masks and performance
@AA Summer School

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ANTHROPOTYPES

Masks and performance

@AA Summer School

London,

2018

Smithfield Meat Market and Billingsgate Fish Market, two insulated worlds, rich and raw – London’s history. 12 newcomers, a 3am visit. Livers, kidneys, intestines, pig trotters – invading all the senses. Fish scales, ice, styrofoam boxes, tentacles – an array of colours and textures.

Fragments, moments and interactions inform a dialogue with the markets – seemingly random elements stand apart, forming narratives and personalities – Anthropotypes. Born from impressions, interrogations and above all, interactions in the market – four new characters from these faceted little worlds emerged.

The Wanderer from the East – an outsider, searching for a common language. The Grinder – constantly monitoring the ongoings at Smithfield, keeping intruders away. Faceless – the quiet soul of the market, seeking the exotic beauty that exists within. The High Priest of Billingsgate – delivering the fishy beings from sea to plate with empathy.

And finally a tasty potluck supper club. A peculiar snapshot of London and a few of its multiple selves – our crafted Anthropotypes.

“This fish soup is bland. Could you pass me the salt?” “Don’t do that.” “This is an eel soup, you will scare them.” “This is an eel soup, you will scare them.” “What do you mean? The eels are dead. I can’t scare them, I am eating them.” “Really? You’ve never heard this?!” “The eels are never dead, they fluctuate between life and afterlife.” “Come on! That’s crap! And then – what about the salt?” “The salt reminds them of his face.” “The salt reminds them of him.” “Him?Who?” “Him!” “Who?” “Him!” “I don’t understand.” “He’s the feeder.” “He’s the killer.” “He holds the cabinet.” “He prepares the coffin.” “I don’t believe you, I will just eat the soup.” “Well, just pay respect to him – he’s the High Priest of Billingsgate.”

Taught and directed by

Lemonot

with

Maghnild Kennedy

Marie Riime

Lorenzo Vitturi

Video

AA students

INDA workshop and exhibition
@H Gallery

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DESIGNING INFORMALITY

INDA workshop and exhibition

@H Gallery

Bangkok,

2020

Bangkok streets are lined with ubiquitous stalls, makeshift kitchens and a large variety of temporary structures selling different food, clothes, and electronic gadgets. This urban condition represents the continuation of a long-standing tradition of informal trade within the community. In such a context, we see informality as an effective response to pre-conceived societal structures, as an instrument to re-organise political and formal imposed conditions. It is rooted in people’s daily life, producing its own social, economic and cultural sphere, manifested through symbolically charged objects and mundane rituals.

The purpose of the workshop was to identify the appropriate design categories to grasp informality into an architectural device. This happened through a speculation built on the pamphlet “Street Food Funeral”, that led to the construction of an inhabitable chariot for a fictional gastronomic requiem: treated as typological device, the chariot became an hybrid synthesis between a market stall and a religious baldaquin.

Researching what the markets already offer, sell and display - we attempted to find a precise logic to curate a variable organization of goods, without misrepresenting the informality and spontaneity of the outcome.

We asked the students to determine the chariot’s architectural conditions, producing a spatial scaffolding to challenge the relationship between the different actors meant to inhabit it: sellers, monks, musicians, guests and pedestrians. Testing a series of imaginary rituals, the ground floor of the H gallery was transformed into a stage-set for happenings and informal gatherings. We thus highlighted the mutual influence between people’s behaviours and designed elements.

The students were encouraged to relentlessly assemble and disassemble a collective product, developing design and construction skills related to the field of movable structures. Particular attention was dedicated to the artisanal crafting of specific ornamental and functional components, to understand the deep connection among aesthetics, mechanisms and spontaneous reactions.

Taught and curated by

Lemonot

with

INDA students

Photos

Prin Tumsatan

INDA urban mural
@WTF Gallery

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STREET FOOD FUNERAL

INDA urban mural

@WTF Gallery

Bangkok,

2018

The mural is a response to the progressive disappearance of Thai street food culture, imposed by the government. It is a representation of its history and its funeral.

“Yet this week, in an attempt to impose some order on the capital’s famed tourist road, the Thai authorities ordered all street vendors selling food, clothes and trinkets to clear off the pavements during the day. “ The Guardian, 2018

“In Bangkok’s Fragrant Street Food, City Planners See a Mess to Clean City planners prefer a more manicured Bangkok, with air-conditioning, malls and Instagrammable dessert cafes — and without the mess and noise of street vendors.” [...] Already, the number of areas designated for street food has decreased from 683 three years ago to 175, according to the Network of Thai Street Vendors for Sustainable Development. [...] “If they want to get rid of us, we can’t do anything to protest because it’s the law,” Ms. Somboon said. “But Bangkok to me is about street food. Without it, it wouldn’t feel the same.” New York Times, 2018

“Thai values on living is a language that has a persuasion and sweet sound. The food they eat is also one persuasion too. But it isn’t just only attract the eyes because it is a traditional way of preparing food in a better way than buying food from a convenience store. But what the government is doing is hurting Bangkok by changing the colorful and beautiful chaos in Bangkok into a boring space to buy food as we are seeing now.” David Thompson (Thai food expert), 2018

“We know each other because of our hunger. You are so chill, we can meet in every place that we want and everytime you make me impressed and gain new experience. “You” - who we are talking about - are “street food”. It doesn’t matter if we’re rich or poor. We already met. We have known street food since we were kids. My grandma always took care of my food, she alway asked me “what are you going to eat today?” until now. [...] Money is the illusion Rice and fish is reality” Street Food Funeral, 2018

Taught and curated by

Lemonot

with

INDA students

Video

Tony

Bangkok, 2019
Singapore, 2019
Milton Keynes, 2019
Bangkok, 2019
Bangkok, 2019
Palermo, 2018
London, 2018
Bangkok, 2018
Bangkok, 2018
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lemonot

Sabrina Morreale, AA Dipl
Lorenzo Perri, AA Dipl (Hons)

projects@lemonot.co.uk

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INFO Lemonot
lemonot

Sabrina Morreale, AA Dipl
Lorenzo Perri, AA Dipl (Hons)

18b Ferntower Road
N52JH London, UK

projects@lemonot.co.uk

ABOUT

Sabrina Morreale and Lorenzo Perri are architects, educators and founding partners of Lemonot – an open platform for spatial and relational practices, born in London on June 24th 2016, the day of Brexit, and now fluctuating among London, Italy, Vienna and Latin America.

Sabrina graduated at the Architectural Association in 2016, awarded with the AA prize. She’s currently teaching in the Foundation course at the AA and in the School of Architecture in Reading.She has taught in Cambridge, while collaborating with various magazines (Rivista Studio, Cartha, Elle), with the RIBA as curator assistant  and with multiple architectural firms in London (OMMX, The Decorators and Office S&M), Her projects always explore notions of fragmentation, assembling techniques and authorship.

Lorenzo graduated with Honours at the Architectural Association in 2016. He’s currently teaching at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna and he’s a consultant for Experimental 9 at the AA. While participating in several competitions with international firms (Amid.Cero9, Elemental), he co-founded the research-based Plakat Platform and the architectural studio Ecòl. Obsessed with geometry and aesthetics, precision and expression, he studied engineering and classical piano before working in architecture.

Through Lemonot, they operate in between architecture and performative arts – using them as devices to detect, celebrate and provoke the spontaneous theatre of everyday life. Spatial production is neither the beginning nor the end of their stories, rather it is a filtering framework to grasp reality. Architecture becomes a medium to produce heterogeneous outcomes: from geometrical patterns and still-lives for the public space to pastry tools and toys, interactive pavilions, short films, performances and embroidered masks.

Their projects have been exhibited and awarded worldwide – at the Venice Biennale, at the YTAA (Young Talent Architecture Award) 2016, at the ATT19 Gallery in Bangkok, at the RIBA (Royal institute of British Architects) Live Drawing Marathon and at Mextropoli 2020 in Mexico City among the others.

Hungry observers and compulsive collectors of anthropic mirabilia, they’re interested in all those iconographic gestures that enable the mutual immanence among objects, bodies and rituals. In particular, their work attempts to define peculiar architectural settings for updated gastronomic performances, with the aim of revealing the symbolism behind food preparation and consumption.

They have been teaching together at the AA Summer School since 2016. In 2018 and 2019 they taught as Adjunct Professors at INDA in Bangkok and they’re now programme Heads of the AA Visiting School El Alto (Bolivia).

Their academic research focuses on contemporary forms of conviviality – as a trigger for unconventional spatial languages, between geometrical abstraction and material figurativism.