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Performative meal
@casa di Belmondo

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CIRCOLO

Performative meal

@casa di Belmondo

Belmonte Calabro,

2020

U miegghjiu cumpani è u pitittu. Appetite is the best side dish.

Who designed the lunch? Who did it? The guests, who have become actors and actresses, creating space rather than just inhabiting it - staging it. Their gestures - movements, glances and grunts - which activated abstract, otherwise dormant forms. However, this system of multiple relationships was suggested precisely by those dormant geometries - meant as neutral platforms to awaken intuition. The ingredients - artificial or organic, edible or nearly toxic - everyone juggled between. And then those who procured them for us, with patience, kindness, timeliness and mastery.

All we had to do was to blend everything as you would do in a complex recipe: one of those dishes with many flavors, which must all be distinguished. The intent was to portray different but compatible pieces of everyday life together, and to mix many stories around a large table set - at the scale of the landscape.

There was a great confusion, it seemed a cauldron of bodies, which, moving and eating together, built the space of their own stage. The pungent smell of salmoriglio was more present than the din of the diners. They all cackled, but with their hands, not with their voices: they were absorbed in a sort of industrious silence, busy grabbing and biting the wild cuttlefish, which, roasted on the grill. It was in that precise moment that a week of discussions about what were the role, the identity and the destiny of the Seppie di Belmondo came to a conclusion. The moist scent of pine bark - apparently crunchy, it made you want to eat that too - was a counterpoint to the coldness of the oxidized metal. Those hard and inflexible circles on top of the ground had been forged by a good giant like Gennaro, a blacksmith from Cosenza with such affable, soft manners. They were tables, pans and bowls, inviting but fortunately really rigid, the only cornerstones of that suddenly initiated dance. Everyone was swiftly going back and forth, finally aware of how to recognize the safe parts of the garden, where they could walk, sit and let themselves go. The Seppie and the roasted cuttlefish were scattered everywhere, but they also orbited around one of the round platforms to which that gastronomic procession was anchored. A little further on, there were heaps of colorful fried vegetables, cultivated with enthusiastic effort by Mariella among the ups and downs of Spineto and cooked following precisely all her suggestions. As a last, more orderly outpost, there was what could not be missing: a row of Belmonte tomatoes, cut into thick slices, arranged like colors on a palette and seasoned theatrically from above, as in a propitiatory dance. At first no one came close to them, since those tomatoes seemed so composed, almost inviolable - you could no more than dare to smell them. But then, as soon as someone started to creatively imagine ways to handle those deliberately inflated proportions, the whole symphony of cheerful disorder naturally started right there, from the tomatoes.

We wanted to construct a simple ritual, in which particular habits could emerge and adapt to each other, stimulated by the right architectural props. Actually we hoped, and it happened, that those who were there would eat and perform spontaneously. We didn’t aim to transfigure routines into exceptions, rather we aimed to finally reveal them as exceptional acts.

Directed and curated by Lemonot

with

La Rivoluzione delle Seppie

Photos

Silvia Gin

Nicola Barbuto

Luca Pitasi

Margherita Manfra

Pavilion
@Countless Cities Biennial

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OASI DEI GOLOSI

Pavilion

@Countless Cities Biennial

Favara (FARM cultural park),

2021

WIP - Coming soon!

Designed by

Lemonot

with

PuccioCollodoro Architetti

Land Art
@Masseria Cultura

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MARBLE SALAD

Land Art

@Masseria Cultura

Puglia,

2020

“Marble Salad” is the main of three spatial still-lifes that have been developed throughout a month-long artist residency at Masseria Cultura, an old vernacular mansion situated in the middle of the countryside in Puglia, Italy.

The project reuses marble debris, collected from various refineries, located in neighbouring villages - then manually interlocked to compose a 4x4m solid platform on the ground. The surface could act as a walkable floor - a stage - or just as a contemplative device - an horizontal tactile and colourful canvas. The precise definition of its borders clashes with the wilderness of the open fields in the backyard of the mansion that surround it.

This area will be soon cultivated and transformed into a vegetable garden - rows of zucchini, aubergines, tomatoes, peas, carrots and purple cabbages will become the updated bucolic frame of the platform.

It’s almost a process of inverted mimesis: the marbles’ polychromy anticipates the organization of the vegetables - the artifice discloses nature.

The notion of time has been fundamental for the artworks, dealing with it in different ways. “Marble Salad” will act as a proper still-life, a permanent frozen snapshot immersed within an iteratively changing environment - the hortus. The other two interventions are instead more ephemeral: “Tra-Forato” is a totem made of hollow bricks, a stage-set for the landscape, a portable scenery flat to frame and construct specific viewpoints; “Red Carpet” was our first spatial intuitive rehearsal in the Masseria, an ironic commentary on the re-usage of humble debris.

The context allowed you to be immersed in nature, fostering both a metaphorical and physical dialogue with the landscape: this dictated not only the timing of the project but also defined the way we used certain materials - exploring issues of permanence, ephemerality and construction rhythm.

The three installations are the result of the collaboration with local old crafters, becoming almost built embodiment of the precious relationship we managed to establish with all of them.

Designed and constructed by

Lemonot

with

Letizia I. H. Tueros

Photos

Nicolò

Urban park
@Larnaca international competition

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SALINA ARCHIPELAGO

Urban park

@Larnaca international competition

Larnaca,

2020

The proposal aims to work with and enhance the main characteristics of the plot, both physically and conceptually, to achieve a composition in the form of a large three dimensional mosaic or tapestry.

There are three main threads in which we researched and unpicked the site and its history: -A former tree/flower nursery for the municipality; -The infrastructural antiquities found hidden under or emerging from the ground which show Larnaca’s rich history and importance in the ancient world; -The inherent etymology “Salina” as a place to harvest and store salt in mount forms which are recorded in paintings and drawings until the 17th century.

It is along these threads that our proposal weaves and layers a variety of systems of gardens and public activities, sewn together in an interplay of colour, size and geometry, to celebrate the multi-cultural past and present of the city as a port: a place of import and export, a cultural hub of multiplicities and nationalities, gathering around the Mediterrenean coast.

The synthesis of the organisational system of the park uses a grid of watering infrastructures emanenting from the ancient aquaducts of the area and incorporates all the existing trees, embedding them into the backbone of our landscape whilst meeting the practical/ technical requirements. The system is a working motherboard or green lung which aims to give back to the city and its people.

Space syntax and compositional method. From notation to architectural plan: -The plot is a canvas. From its inception, the proposal attempts to incorporate the existing natural characteristics and planting which assume a primary role in the composition. These trees become preliminary nodes in the evolution of the drafting and compositional system of the proposal. -A bold continuous loop takes form around the park boundaries, weaving the entire site as one generous simple gesture that seeks to define the space. This becomes the main access route and the synthetic element along which our proposal evolves. -The circular motion creates two opposite diagonal subdivisions that we envision as a rock garden. These spaces offer a natural low maintenance setting. -A horizontal frame is applied to highlight the existing perimeter path and to restore the existing circulation route of the plot. -The horizontal bead or threads of the frame extend from west to east to add an element of rhythm, distance and scale. This becomes part of the system and practical logic for the design of the park that incorporates water systems and determines distances for its planting by adding structure and color. We connect this system to the existing trees to organise the core of our archipelago. -An archipelago of islands are therefore anchored along the horizontal grain of the tapestry and incorporate the existing geometries of the space, as well as trees, which we studied during our visit to the site. The goal is to tease out the concept of land management, ‘archeology’, of tree nursery and garden. The islands introduce varieties of field typologies, vegetation, colours and activities in the park, amalgamating in the composition.

The planting scheme establishes a natural design which includes and respects the native species and the existing vegetation. The proposed vegetation is resilient to Cyprus weather, in particular the drought of summer months. One of the main features of the proposal is its materiality, inspired by the geology and history of the city of Larnaca. Raw materials and materials from the earth, are managed with different techniques and energies to create a new topography with parallels to quarries, the Salina and the gardens.

In any form of artificial garden or partially landscaped garden there must be an underlying structure; a canvas or grid geometry to define and structure the systems. This is also similar to the natural weaving of a piece of wallpaper but also the creation of a multidimensional landscape composition that incorporates structure, depth and colour to make it understandable and beautiful. Visitors are free to roam and immerse themselves in this rich, thick tapestry of composition, with paths of experiences and scales that bring elements of Larnaca as a natural landscape into a miniature cartography, a physical archive to be mentally absorbed in its entirety and for one to dwell upon.

Designed by

Lemonot

with

Urban Radicals

Christophoros Kyriakides

Adam Harris

Images

Sonia Magdziarz

Inhabitable sculpture
@AntePavilion competition

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LOVE 19

Inhabitable sculpture

@AntePavilion competition

London,

2020

Love19 is an inhabitable, performative sculpture with a multiple nature: a table at the scale of architecture, a scenographic shelter, a permeable enfilade, made of hollow columns to be climbed - a roof to sit on, to admire the city and landscape from a unusual perspective.

Each column opens upwards, transforming itself into a lightweight fan vault: all together, juxtaposed and intersected, they give life to a shaded corridor, in which the light playfully manifests itself between the ribs and the curtains. The columns build an horizontal thick surface, flattened in the part facing the sky, at a height of 3.15 m As suspended garlands, each module is in fact composed of 48 flags of various shapes, in translucent white fabric, which wrap two rows of tennis referee chairs and support two sequences of green metal sunburst sticks.

This hanging elevated table - a geometric interweaving of 912 artificial foliage - features considerable dimensions: it's 17.35 meters long and 5.60 meters wide. Below it, between 40 and 50 people can linger simultaneously. At the table, however, there are only 19 seats. The exception creates the entrance, otherwise each diner sits 2.60 meters from those in front and 1.60 meters from those on the sides.

These are the dimensional parameters that quantify the artefact - the result of a diligent reflection on the current times. However, Love19 offers an alternative to the sadly recurring ready-to-use solutions - those that attempt to change directly and quickly certain rooted behaviours, established over time. Bodily relationships can be designed, rethought, even fabricated, but - fortunately - not controlled. They can't be measured in centimetres.

Love19 does not try to constrain, to adjust: it re-shuffles the proportions between space and objects, it aims to alter the foundations of perception and motor coordination that regulate the ordinary - it claims to stimulate a radically new use of the body. Love19 is designed to suggest, but it opens up to instinct, intuition, a physicality free to transform itself. Love19 invites - with pragmatic optimism - to rethink, creatively, movements and devices for the public space.

Designed by

Lemonot

Performative meal
@Kitchen Takeover _ Open Space Contemporary

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IL PRANZO DELLA DOMENICA

Performative meal

@Kitchen Takeover _ Open Space Contemporary

Collevecchio,

2020

From our confinement in the countryside of Rome, we re-enact the conditions of a festive Sunday lunch, transforming a big wooden table into a surreal stage-set. We populate it with extravagant objects, ingredients, dishes, and memories. Everyone is invited. We perform at the table and this happens as a natural act: the Sunday lunch in Italy is by definition an ordinary yet exceptionally theatrical performance.

Sunday lunch is not a simple meal, it is a marathon. Therefore our project starts at the first light of dawn, when the kitchen begins to speak, to come alive, while all the members of the family sleep, in a triumph of smells and flavours, starting to prepare the sauce with which to season the pasta.

“A pig with a rosemary forest in the belly” - Carlo Emilio Gadda The hostess holds in her arms a roasted pig, “porchetta” - a dish traditionally eaten on special occasions, feasts and gatherings. Carrying its weight like a sacrificial animal, her parade starts from the kitchen until it reaches the table. The pork belly was filled with sage, pepper, salt and rosemary and cooked for over 6 hours. The scent lingers throughout the house, leaving behind a delicious aroma. We are all slowly waking up, with high hopes and expectations for this ‘first’ Sunday lunch together.

A sense of fear remains, you can smell it whilst preparing this delicious dish. After months of greed, feasting on negative news, frightening articles, and headlines from all over the world, we are still scared. Surely, the guests will blissfully jump on this porchetta. Yet, we can’t forget, we have been consumed by what we have witnessed: this moment of celebration is hiding a bitter aftertaste.

The verb "porchettare" means to stuff the meat with aromas and spices, whilst continuing to massage it, until achieving a harmonious blend. Similarly, hands, pieces of meat and cutlery intertwine into a visual feast of expressive trajectories and evocative gestures.

Food is not only an allegorical connector amongst the guests during this Sunday lunch. The porchetta, thanks to its copious length, becomes a physical place of encounter: via cutting, grabbing, sharing - hands can finally meet at the centre of the table, fulfilling the mutual lust for togetherness.

These hours spent in the countryside have left visible marks on the table, appearing now as a kind of violent and passionate battlefield. Generous meals in Italy are often associated with cheerful warfare, where even angels have to surrender to sins of gluttony. The culinary match has just ended.

Directed and curated by

Lemonot

with

Arianna Zamparelli

Palma Bucarelli

Marianna Morreale

Federico Armeni

Leone Hadavi

Federico Angeloni

Zobeide Hadavi

Tommaso Riccitelli

Carlotta Dotto

Anna Previte

Alessandra Frustaci

Rita Elvira Adamo

Felix Doeple

Video

Filippo Bonza Brachetti

Edible pavilion
@Mextropoli Festival (1st Prize)

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GASTRONOMIC PALAPA

Edible pavilion

@Mextropoli Festival (1st Prize)

Mexico City,

2021

"La comida, más que las especulaciones místicas, es una manera segura de acercarse a un pueblo y a su cultura" Octavio Paz.

Alameda Central, once an Aztec marketplace, today becomes the context for the Gastronomic Palapa: a temporary polysemic place a public chillies dryer a cathedral of sounds and colours a convivial collective mesa

Octavio Paz describes how through the art of cooking we can talk about cultural identity. What we eat and how we relate to the food and resources we have today defines a cultural and historical debate. Completely made by Chiles Secos, the triangular-shaped dryer is constructed with a series of wooden arches forming an inverted thatched roof that acts as a communal palapa.

3500 bunches of chillies become the main elements to inform the materiality of the pavilion. They’re attached progressively to each wooden arch, creating a colourful sequence to walk through. The lowest entrance is at 2.50m from the ground, while the peak is at 6.5 m. The pavilion covers an area of 108sqm2.

The chillies knotted together define a variegated cloister where glimmers of light draw shadows on the ground made of recycled clay tiles, inviting the visitor to smells and colours in contrast with the jacaranda trees. Guajillo, Pasilla, Puya, Arbol chillies will be hung inside of the pavilion, safe from birds, but hot enough to dry throughout the days of Mextropoli2020.

The audience will participate in the drying process from arranging the chillies in green bunches, to observing them slowly turning into a bright red colour during the exsiccation. The last day, the pavilion will be deconstructed directly by the public who wish to take a bunch back home. Throughout the days, the chilli will become brittle to touch and their seeds will be heard inside when shaken.

The sheltered space communicates to the exuberant Alameda through a series of tables. La Mesa as a medium to connect interior and exterior, providing a fertile ground for spontaneous gatherings. Gastronomic palapa is an architecture to be bodily consumed.

Directed by Arquine

Curated by Lemonot

with

Federico Fauli

Inhabitable sculpture
@Neuchatel Competition

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TRIBAL CANDELA

Inhabitable sculpture

@Neuchatel Competition

Mexico City,

2020

Ten meters high, Tribal Candela is a form of permanent ars topiaria, an habitable metal sculpture, covered with the purple flowers of jacaranda trees which help to mitigate the environmental pollution and introduce buffering microclimatic variations in the city by nature.

Among the crowded streets, tribal candela becomes a shaded space to hide from the chaotic noise of the city. An urban soft canopy which resembles the thin shells, popularly known as cascarones, designed by Felix Candela.

The curve that rises upwards becomes a point of reference and meeting place - a spatial and sensorial experience through strong colours and smells. It is an architecture that makes you want to look up, through the opening cone to the sky.

Tribal candela invites you in, capturing your gaze in ordinary moments: from the outside it moves as if it was breathing, the leaves change color and are shaken by the wind, catching the viewer’s eye - framing the environment and the sky around

Tribal candela is a piece of work which becomes interactive through the users moving throughout the piece, changing character depending on the needs of the people. A space for the community to be used yet intimate and unique.

Once you enter, the sound of the frenetic city outside is muffled. You can use the space as a moment of peace, of play, of conversation or waiting. Tribal Candela is also a platform for observing people wandering from one sidewalk to another, shops opening and closing, cars and street vendors. A platform to observe daily rituals in Mexico city. A place to enhance everyday life; in a space that changes and evolves daily, where the users are the main protagonists.

The petals of the vaulted dome are constructed with a reticular steel structure, cladded with colourful and crafted textiles. The dome supports an actual topiary piece made of thin steel cage which lets the jacaranda flowers grow naturally through time.

Designed by

Lemonot

with

Federico Fauli

Images

Federico Fauli

Diego Ariza

MONUMENTALLY AUTOMATIC

Exhibition and Performance
@ Baan Rim Nam

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MONUMENTALLY AUTOMATIC

Exhibition and Performance

@ Baan Rim Nam

Bangkok Design Week,

2020

Henrietta Moore: “the future learning will not be about the transferability of whole models with known outcomes, but rather about incomplete learning, experimentation and collaboration.”

Monumentally Automatic is an installation built in two weeks and in collaboration with ten of the most iconic characters and shop owners in old neighbourhood of Talat Noi, Bangkok.Talad Noi is one of the most charming district in Bangkok as it still remain immersed in local traditions and lifestyle despite the city’s unceasing pace of development towards modernity. The neighbourhood remains almost hidden, in between the narrow streets where “Sieng Gong” shops are set in garages or private homes. These shops are the soul of the neighbourhood, selling second hand machine parts around the globe. Sieng Gong are urban pockets for re-usable industrial parts which are welded in the middle of the streets, in houses which are turned into storages or abandoned garages.

These places are statuary rooms - apparently frozen yet relentlessly changing, passing on the knowledge to recognize the mechanical parts between generations but also as a system of integration - since the majority of those who do this work are half Thai and half Chinese. Each Sieng Gong has at least 25000 pieces which are accumulated and preserved into a mountain of mechanical parts. From the outside it looks like a landscape of heterogeneous metallic piles, where the layers of these piles can be seen as the constructed timeline of the neighborhood’s history.

The growth of “Sieng Gong” started in the aftermath of the Second World War and it has always been a controversial establishment with harsh and unhealthy living conditions. Even today these shops continue to be hidden and almost forgotten.

Monumentally Automatic wants to emphasize the importance of these people, practices and places, which should be considered as identitarian for Bangkok’s past and future. We approached the oldest sellers and we involved them in cataloging and untangling their mountains in order to build a public catalog of all these pieces. The installation was a collective process of assembling pieces together with a final auction where for the first time they came to explain their story and share their hard work, selling the parts not as mechanical fragments but as art pieces. The first act of this projects, initiated during the BkkDW2020, ultimately aims to highlight the nature of Sieng Gong as a spontaneous cultural lab, where the sellers, by relentlessly performing their daily routines, become unconscious yet active crafters of a collective, peculiar, iconographical palimpsest.

Directed and curated by

Lemonot

with

Pam Anantrungroj

Nithikorn Plawan

Photos

Prin Tumsatan

Artist residency
@Insula Lab

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GLUTTONY’S TRIUMPH

Artist residency

@Insula Lab

Palermo,

2020

Designed and constructed by

Lemonot

Photos

Giulia Granvillano

Belmonte, 2020
Favara, 2019
Puglia, 2020
Larnaca, 2020
London, 2020
Mexico City, 2020
Mexico City, 2020
Bangkok, 2020
Palermo, 2019
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lemonot

Sabrina Morreale, AA Dipl
Lorenzo Perri, AA Dipl (Hons)

projects@lemonot.co.uk

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INFO Lemonot
lemonot

Sabrina Morreale, AA Dipl
Lorenzo Perri, AA Dipl (Hons)

18b Ferntower Road
N52JH London, UK

projects@lemonot.co.uk

ABOUT

Sabrina Morreale and Lorenzo Perri are architects, educators and founding partners of Lemonot – an open platform to seek and design built worlds, born in London on June 24th 2016, the day of Brexit, and now fluctuating among Europe, Bangkok and Latin America.

Sabrina graduated at the Architectural Association in 2016, awarded with the AA prize. She’s currently teaching in the Foundation course at the AA and in the School of Architecture in Reading.She has taught in Cambridge, while collaborating with various magazines (Rivista Studio, Cartha, Elle), with the RIBA as curator assistant  and with multiple architectural firms in London (OMMX, The Decorators and Office S&M), Her projects always explore notions of fragmentation, assembling techniques and authorship.

Lorenzo graduated with Honours at the Architectural Association in 2016. He’s currently teaching at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna and he’s a consultant for Experimental 9 at the AA. While participating in several competitions with international firms (Amid.Cero9, Elemental), he co-founded the research-based Plakat Platform and the architectural studio Ecòl. Obsessed with geometry and aesthetics, precision and expression, he studied engineering and classical piano before working in architecture.

Through Lemonot, they operate in between architecture and performative arts – using them as devices to detect, celebrate and trigger the spontaneous theatre of everyday life. Spatial production is neither the beginning nor the end of their stories, rather it’s a filtering framework to grasp reality. Architecture becomes a medium to produce heterogeneous outcomes: from story-telling to still-lifes, from pastry tools to embroidered garments.

Their projects have been exhibited and awarded worldwide – at the 14th Venice Biennale, at the YTAA (Young Talent Architecture Award) 2016, at the ATT19 Gallery in Bangkok, at the RIBA (Royal institute of British Architects) Live Drawing Marathon and at Mextropoli 2020 in Mexico City among the others.

Hungry observers and compulsive collectors of anthropic mirabilia, they’re interested in all those iconographic gestures that enable the mutual immanence among objects, bodies and rituals. In particular, their work attempts to define peculiar architectural settings for updated gastronomic performances, with the aim of revealing the symbolism behind food preparation and consumption.

They have been teaching together at the AA Summer School since 2016. In 2018 and 2019 they taught as Adjunct Professors at INDA in Bangkok and they’re now programme Heads of the AA Visiting School El Alto (Bolivia).

Their academic research focuses on contemporary folklore – as a trigger for unconventional spatial languages, between geometrical abstraction and material figurativism.