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Edible pavilion
@Mextropoli Festival (1st Prize)

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GASTRONOMIC PALAPA

Edible pavilion

@Mextropoli Festival (1st Prize)

Mexico City,

2021

"La comida, más que las especulaciones místicas, es una manera segura de acercarse a un pueblo y a su cultura" Octavio Paz.

Alameda Central, once an Aztec marketplace, today becomes the context for the Gastronomic Palapa: a temporary polysemic place a public chillies dryer a cathedral of sounds and colours a convivial collective mesa

Octavio Paz describes how through the art of cooking we can talk about cultural identity. What we eat and how we relate to the food and resources we have today defines a cultural and historical debate. Completely made by Chiles Secos, the triangular-shaped dryer is constructed with a series of wooden arches forming an inverted thatched roof that acts as a communal palapa.

3500 bunches of chillies become the main elements to inform the materiality of the pavilion. They’re attached progressively to each wooden arch, creating a colourful sequence to walk through. The lowest entrance is at 2.50m from the ground, while the peak is at 6.5 m. The pavilion covers an area of 108sqm2.

The chillies knotted together define a variegated cloister where glimmers of light draw shadows on the ground made of recycled clay tiles, inviting the visitor to smells and colours in contrast with the jacaranda trees. Guajillo, Pasilla, Puya, Arbol chillies will be hung inside of the pavilion, safe from birds, but hot enough to dry throughout the days of Mextropoli2020.

The audience will participate in the drying process from arranging the chillies in green bunches, to observing them slowly turning into a bright red colour during the exsiccation. The last day, the pavilion will be deconstructed directly by the public who wish to take a bunch back home. Throughout the days, the chilli will become brittle to touch and their seeds will be heard inside when shaken.

The sheltered space communicates to the exuberant Alameda through a series of tables. La Mesa as a medium to connect interior and exterior, providing a fertile ground for spontaneous gatherings. Gastronomic palapa is an architecture to be bodily consumed.

Directed by Arquine

Curated by Lemonot

with

Federico Fauli

Inhabitable sculpture
@Neuchatel Competition

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TRIBAL CANDELA

Inhabitable sculpture

@Neuchatel Competition

Mexico City,

2020

Ten meters high, Tribal Candela is a form of permanent ars topiaria, an habitable metal sculpture, covered with the purple flowers of jacaranda trees which help to mitigate the environmental pollution and introduce buffering microclimatic variations in the city by nature.

Among the crowded streets, tribal candela becomes a shaded space to hide from the chaotic noise of the city. An urban soft canopy which resembles the thin shells, popularly known as cascarones, designed by Felix Candela.

The curve that rises upwards becomes a point of reference and meeting place - a spatial and sensorial experience through strong colours and smells. It is an architecture that makes you want to look up, through the opening cone to the sky.

Tribal candela invites you in, capturing your gaze in ordinary moments: from the outside it moves as if it was breathing, the leaves change color and are shaken by the wind, catching the viewer’s eye - framing the environment and the sky around

Tribal candela is a piece of work which becomes interactive through the users moving throughout the piece, changing character depending on the needs of the people. A space for the community to be used yet intimate and unique.

Once you enter, the sound of the frenetic city outside is muffled. You can use the space as a moment of peace, of play, of conversation or waiting. Tribal Candela is also a platform for observing people wandering from one sidewalk to another, shops opening and closing, cars and street vendors. A platform to observe daily rituals in Mexico city. A place to enhance everyday life; in a space that changes and evolves daily, where the users are the main protagonists.

The petals of the vaulted dome are constructed with a reticular steel structure, cladded with colourful and crafted textiles. The dome supports an actual topiary piece made of thin steel cage which lets the jacaranda flowers grow naturally through time.

Designed by

Lemonot

with

Federico Fauli

Images

Federico Fauli

Diego Ariza

Inhabi-Table
@Foodculturedays_competition

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HOU GOU FONDUE

Inhabi-Table

@Foodculturedays_competition

Vevey,

2019

All I want is a bowl of chop suey, A bowl of chop suey and you-ey, A cozy little table for two-ey, With a bowl of chop suey and you-ey. For a place that’s very Chinesy Is nice for a hug and squeezy, Where we can do a billion coo-eys With a bowl of chop suey for two-ey. Ben Bernie, Alyce Goering, and Walter Bullock, “A Bowl of Chop Suey and You-ey,” 1934, as performed by Sam Robbins and his Hotel McAlpin Orchestra

China was the first to attempt export of goods/ culture on a massive global scale with the Silk Roads. The trade routes not only became a way of exchange of goods but subsequently transformed into veins pumping culture, from one place to another. Food, music, art, language can be traced travelling this physical networks around the globe, in some cases adapted and re-appropriated whilst at others displacing what was once the norm.

The Silk Roads set the basis of a huge change from local to global, from intra to inter - globalisation; a word that has re-emerged as a concept with the boom of the internet and infrastructure and has overshadowed the world from early 90’s until today. Massive debates on the pros and cons - an open free market, cultural and material cross pollination, access to a global economy where countries have a voice outside the context they have operated for centuries. With the evolution of technology, the spread of knowledge, exchange nurtured this massive spread of ideas from micro to macro scale, from local to global. A dish invented in a street market somewhere could be scaled up into a world-wide phenomenon.

Yet the negative effects of this free movement of ideas, products, dishes infiltrating into different worlds and cultures has been alarming for some. The once tiny dish served in one area, scaled up and exported into different contexts cities overshadowing and ‘killing’ the local. Corporations capitalising on this dishes which in a way substitute local culture dishes and eliminating them.

This in particular has caused another movement against global food, against the faceless ‘corporation’ wanting to preserve the local cultures. Yet what is really local? We are at the point now that we are agonising on notions of authenticity, locality and truth. The term itself has often become a marketing construct to sell a product which has no longer a true identity. Locality has been bought by large corporations, wrapped and packaged and resold to the public.

Our project looks at how the Lazy Susan, an invention made in the US to share food on the table. It was exported and assimilated within China then re-exported back into the world. Our fascination with China and its long history exporting culture becomes the departure point and the main trigger for the Hou Gou table. We looked into Chinatowns and how these micro depictions of the mainland, emerge in every major city, showing how the country operates and handles physical and conceptual territory to establish itself in foreign lands.

This phenomenon of Chinese micro worlds, in cities around the world became the basis for our speculative fiction. Exotic islands floating against western cities, bright luscious red colours, exuberant pagodas and mythical dragons of the far east floating within our western cities of brick. We were interested not only in how their rich recipes and dishes are consumed within foreign territories but also how China has found a recipe to establish itself in the built environment and create a strong identity which can be easily replicated, pasted and appropriated around the world. Starting from a dish such as the hot pot, scaling up to the table, interior, street and whole building blocks, it has generated a robust presence and a business paradigm like no other. China has managed to export these conceptual islands to the rest of the world creating an archipelago of culture which infiltrates and enriches our cities.

Designed by

Lemonot

with

Urban radicals

Alberto Gramigni

Social table
@Ciciri via Lattarini

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TUTTI FRUTTI

Social table

@Ciciri via Lattarini

Palermo,

2019

Designed by

Lemonot

with

Francesca Leone

Francesca Malleo

Workshop and performance
@AAvs El Alto

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PORTABLE CHOLETS

Workshop and performance

@AAvs El Alto

El Alto,

2019

Portable Cholets: La mesa wants to experiment with anthropomorphic languages, ritualistic usages and composite video-editing - to re-enact part of the festive equipment that inspire and populate Freddy Mamani’s architectures.

Cholets are a privileged testing ground for these qualities: how can folkloric masks and costumes trigger an effective architectural cycle where inhabitation and aesthetic languages become mutually exclusive?

What is unique at a time where superficial otherness seems to have become the standard, where vernacular spontaneity has been replaced by overconstructed only polished photoshop images? El Alto gives us the opportunity to conceive architecture as a performative act - enabling the mutual immanence between bodies and spaces, objects and ceremonies. For us, performing fulfills necessities that have little to do with practical efficiency or quantitative variables. Rather, it is an evocative tool to activate symbolic links, to claim back identitarian needs and to depict qualitative hedonistic traits into physical spatial compounds.

Taught and directed by

Lemonot

with

Patricio Crooker

Marcos Loayza

Freddy Mamani Silvestre

AAvs students

Video

Alma Films

Inhabi-Table
@Hellowood Festival

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THE CARNIVAL TABLE

Inhabi-Table

@Hellowood Festival

Csóromfölde,

2019

In a contemporary society that is dangerously drifting towards alienation, mainstream architecture offers very little resistance. On one hand, massive real estate developments impose highly standardized forms governed by the logics of marketing. On the other hand, starchitects impose their superficial signature in an endless effort to be different from the competition. The actual users end up inhabiting spaces that represent very little - if nothing - of themselves. Ikea knick-knacks are the last resort to give a resemblance of identity to their homes.

Carnival was born as a temporary inversion of social conventions - can we speculate on how to invert reactionary architectural conventions? We want to use the ritual of eating and the symbolic power of a dining table - a place where people meet at the same level - in order to discard conventions and encourage a different practice of design, rooted in conviviality and freedom. By uncovering symbolic and social constructions through food, we aim to prompt a debate rich of symbolic explanations about human behaviour and rituals.

The table is an ancient place of unity, cohesion, equal exchange. Around the table the man enjoyed, rejoiced, but above all he told. From Plato's Symposium to Dante's Convivio, the stories that have been handed down before a meal are those that have invented and narrated the world.

We believe that it’s time for architecture to establish a new intimacy with its users, to become more human, to create culture and foster social interaction. With our Carnival table, we want architecture to provide space for self-expression instead of uniformity. We want architecture to draw people together instead of isolating them. We want architecture to be able to create stories again.

Designed and constructed by

Lemonot

with

Space Saloon

Collective Plant

Photos

Zsuzsa Darab

INDA workshop and exhibition
@ATT19 Gallery

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THE CHINATOWN EFFECT

INDA workshop and exhibition

@ATT19 Gallery

Bangkok,

2019

“The Chinatown effect” is a temporary installation at the ATT19 gallery designed and constructed in four weeks by INDA students in Bangkok. The project starts as a site-specific stage set, a series of props and composite videos investigating the notion of commonality and stereotype - in relationship to the world of Chinatown(s) as social typologies. When analysed through the Chinese cultural attitude towards reproducibility, the proliferation of Chinatowns reveals a network of what we define “authentic trans-territorial clichés”. We need to craft challenging techniques for the legitimization and preservation of such a specific yet diffused identity: Chinatowns are constantly reconstructed and experienced in different parts of the world, growing into a familiar system of habits, reminiscences and iconographical values that became a simulacrum of a sophisticated, layered domesticity for everybody.

Once inside the pavilion, the spectator, through videos on multiple screens, inhabit a “Chinatownised “ world made of communal rituals. The stage set itself, through its materiality, structure and ornaments, is a spatial manifestation of stereotypical yet identitarian forces: an inhabitable red folie, a dragon, a votive pavilion - a purposely recognizable architectural cliché. The project was first conceived and exhibited in Bangkok, then it will travel around the globe, to be showcased in the Chinatowns of different continents.

The Oxford Dictionary defines “Chinatown” as “a district of any non-Chinese town, especially a city or seaport, in which the population is predominantly of Chinese origin”. However, some Chinatowns may have little to do with China, while they certainly have in common with other Chinatowns in different locations. Indeed, if one hand these communities were able to resist and preserve their cultural origins more than other ethnic enclaves, they were also subject to a natural process of diffusion, exposure and commodification - that witnessed the rise of a worldwide shared "Chinatownised" identity. Travellers find there secure places where to recollect memories and authentic experiences. Clusters of exotic stimulating clichés - goods, signs and behaviours - that trigger an intuitive sense of familiarity and international domesticity.

The Chinese have two different concepts of a copy. Fangzhipin are imitations where the difference from the original is obvious. These are small models or copies that can be purchased in a museum shop, for example. The second concept for a copy is Fuzhipin. They are exact reproductions of the original, which, for the Chinese, are of equal value to the original. It has absolutely no negative connotations. The discrepancy with regard to the understanding of what a copy has often led to misunderstandings and arguments between Chinese and Western culture. Especially for Europeans, it’s difficult to accept that identity and renewal can be not mutually exclusive. Instead, in the Chinese culture - where continual reproduction represents a technique for conservation and preservation - replicas are anything but mere copies.

Taught and curated by

Lemonot

with

INDA students

Mook Attakanwong

Mook Attakanwong

Exhibition and Performance
@Archi Fest Singapore

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METTICI LA FACCIA

Exhibition and Performance

@Archi Fest Singapore

Singapore,

2019

“I cannot do a building without building a new repertoire of characters, of stories, of language and it’s all parallel. It’s not just building per se. It’s building worlds” J. Hejduk

We have been affected by a strange form of spatial Pareidolia. We are obsessively looking for anthropomorphic traces - hidden in the built apparatus that shapes the world. Our designs could not exist without the invention of the bizarre troupe supposed to populate them. Their stories, fears and love affairs intimately inform the architectural substance itself. Each building becomes a peculiar persona.

We practice only forms of knowledge based on physical experience: direct or emerged through the tangible re-enactment of empirical conditions. Speculation isn’t understood as pure invention or as a biased device to fill the gaps left by our uncertainties, but as a lens to frame and relentlessly process reality through design culture. The project is a journey articulated through a series of spatial performances. For us, performing has little to do with practical efficiency or quantitative variables. Rather, it is an evocative tool to activate symbolic links, to claim back identitarian needs and to depict qualitative hedonistic traits into physical spatial compounds.

The design process is nurtured through the assemblage of composite filters to enhance or alterate the human perception of coexisting beings, objects and spaces. Through a palimpsest of precise drawings and short films, we engaged with the architectural effects they produced on the real. The performative representation of space, together with its peculiar synthases and syntax, is an effective tool for a linguistic self-liberation: architects are provided with an appropriate vocabulary that finally re-connects them with a wider public.

Directed and curated by

Lemonot

with

Federico Armeni

Palma Bucarelli

Arianna Zamparelli

Simone Salviati

Tommaso Riccitelli

Gianluca Lorenzini

Vincenzo Morreale

Stacy Peh

Video

Agnese Sumonte

Pavilion _competition
@Festival of Creative Urban Living

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THE INFLATABLE HUT

Pavilion _competition

@Festival of Creative Urban Living

Milton Keynes,

2019

Milton Keynes ‘s community will soon experience a set of urban mirabilia: roundabouts will be turned into agoras, crossing lines into playgrounds and parking lots in gathering compounds.

In such a context we propose an inhabitable festive object. An optimistic round shape to attract and cuddle the visitors, a lightly monumental framework to strengthen the celebratory apparatus of this festival.

A temporary structure that is indeed ephemeral and utopian. Feel free to walk through it or to stay for longer - a pleasant breeze will blow filtered by the hanging telescopes. A rigid basement which acts as an urban carpet - punctured by three different paths: from two sides extravagant portals are welcoming pedestrian, fast bikers, and slow thinkers while a tiny path entering from the small mouth of the balloon is large enough just to crawl in. A privileged door only for curious children.

Once inside, the basement itself becomes a smooth bench; then, rings of soft seats arise from the perimeter, framing a 360 intimate theatre: a place to rest alone or to laugh together. Eventually, anchored on top of everything, this colorful balloon stands silently: an architecture to be questioned - impalpable yet very present.

Designed by

Lemonot

Micro tools – Suitcase
@Milan Design Week

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LIBIDINAL PERSPECTIVES

Micro tools - Suitcase

@Milan Design Week

Milan,

2019

Our tools are our references. Our references are our obsessions. As hedonistic adventurers, we could only work through those - our obsessions are the only burden that we carry around. We haunt for patterns which are forged by the anatomy of pleasure, forms shaped through irreverent gestures and everything that speaks of an erotic language. We wallow in foam, asking blacksmiths to fabricate creamy glaze. Fond of tactile smells, we confused the carver with a mysterious mixologist. We love to objectify – to transform ideas literally and wildly into an apparatus of built dreams. Our working table is a potluck between production and consumption - front and back – depression and euphoria.

In how many ways you can use a pair of boobs? Porn for the privileged, Architecture for Everyone.

Designed and constructed by

Lemonot

Exhibition

KooZA/rch

(Ab)Normal

Mexico City, 2020
Mexico City, 2020
Vevey, 2019
Palermo, 2019
La Paz, 2019
Budapest, 2019
Bangkok, 2019
Singapore, 2019
Milton Keynes, 2019
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lemonot

Sabrina Morreale, AA Dipl
Lorenzo Perri, AA Dipl (Hons)

projects@lemonot.co.uk

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INFO Lemonot
lemonot

Sabrina Morreale, AA Dipl
Lorenzo Perri, AA Dipl (Hons)

18b Ferntower Road
N52JH London, UK

projects@lemonot.co.uk

ABOUT

Sabrina Morreale and Lorenzo Perri are architects, educators and founding partners of Lemonot – an open platform to seek and design built worlds, born in London on June 24th 2016, the day of Brexit, and now fluctuating among Europe, Bangkok and Latin America.

Sabrina graduated at the Architectural Association in 2016, awarded with the AA prize. She’s currently teaching in the Foundation course at the AA and in the School of Architecture in Reading.She has taught in Cambridge, while collaborating with various magazines (Rivista Studio, Cartha, Elle), with the RIBA as curator assistant  and with multiple architectural firms in London (OMMX, The Decorators and Office S&M), Her projects always explore notions of fragmentation, assembling techniques and authorship.

Lorenzo graduated with Honours at the Architectural Association in 2016. He’s currently teaching at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna and he’s a consultant for Experimental 9 at the AA. While participating in several competitions with international firms (Amid.Cero9, Elemental), he co-founded the research-based Plakat Platform and the architectural studio Ecòl. Obsessed with geometry and aesthetics, precision and expression, he studied engineering and classical piano before working in architecture.

Through Lemonot, they operate in between architecture and performative arts – using them as devices to detect, celebrate and trigger the spontaneous theatre of everyday life. Spatial production is neither the beginning nor the end of their stories, rather it’s a filtering framework to grasp reality. Architecture becomes a medium to produce heterogeneous outcomes: from story-telling to still-lifes, from pastry tools to embroidered garments.

Their projects have been exhibited and awarded worldwide – at the 14th Venice Biennale, at the YTAA (Young Talent Architecture Award) 2016, at the ATT19 Gallery in Bangkok, at the RIBA (Royal institute of British Architects) Live Drawing Marathon and at Mextropoli 2020 in Mexico City among the others.

Hungry observers and compulsive collectors of anthropic mirabilia, they’re interested in all those iconographic gestures that enable the mutual immanence among objects, bodies and rituals. In particular, their work attempts to define peculiar architectural settings for updated gastronomic performances, with the aim of revealing the symbolism behind food preparation and consumption.

They have been teaching together at the AA Summer School since 2016. In 2018 and 2019 they taught as Adjunct Professors at INDA in Bangkok and they’re now programme Heads of the AA Visiting School El Alto (Bolivia).

Their academic research focuses on contemporary folklore – as a trigger for unconventional spatial languages, between geometrical abstraction and material figurativism.